A demographer breaks down elderly Russians' survival odds once the retirement age goes up

Meduza
11:10, 12 july 2018

In June, the Russian government submitted draft legislation to the State Duma, establishing a plan to raise the country’s retirement age from 60 to 65 for men by 2028, and from 55 to 63 for women by 2034. Public opinion polls show that Russians largely oppose this proposal, and one of the most common objections is that people fear they won’t live to collect their pensions under the new system.

Ilya Kashnitsky, a doctoral student at the University of Groningen and the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute, has crunched the numbers and helped Meduza create a series of maps showing the probability that Russian men and women already at their respective retirement ages will live to reach the proposed pension ages.

The likelihood that women will live from 55 to 63
Compiled by Ilya Kashnitsky, 2018 (ikashnitsky.github.io); Data from the Russian Database on Fertility and Mortality 2016
The likelihood that men will live from 60 to 65
Compiled by Ilya Kashnitsky, 2018 (ikashnitsky.github.io); Data from the Russian Database on Fertility and Mortality 2016

You can find a whole lot more maps and graphs (in Russian) here.