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A view of the Achipse chalet near the Krasnaya Polyana Resort
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The other ‘Putin’s palace’ Russian newspaper offers an inside look at another luxury residence allegedly linked to the president

Source: Sobedsednik
A view of the Achipse chalet near the Krasnaya Polyana Resort
A view of the Achipse chalet near the Krasnaya Polyana Resort
Scanpix / LETA

The Russian newspaper Sobesednik has published a new report on another luxury residence supposedly linked to Russian President Vladimir Putin. Located in the Krasnodar territory, the “Achipse chalet” — officially owned by Gazprom — reportedly contains a vast collection of expensive furniture and decorations. It’s also a no-fly zone for unauthorized drones, complete with its own radar protection system, and it’s freely accessible to Russia’s Secret Service, Sobesednik writes.

In a new report, the Russian newspaper Sobesednik describes the expensive furniture and decor inside the Achipse chalet — a luxury residence near the Krasnaya Polyana Resort in the southern Krasnodar territory with alleged links to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

This property was reported on in 2014 by journalist and blogger Andrey Malgin, who previously released photos of a nearby residence supposedly belonging to Dmitry Medvedev, Russia’s prime minister at the time. According to Malgin, Medvedev’s residence was located near the Krasnaya Polyana Resort and documents referred to it as a “reception house for official guests” called “Psekhako.” One source told the journalist that it’s construction was funded by the Dar Foundation, which featured in Alexey Navalny’s famous corruption investigation into Medvedev, “Don’t Call Him Dimon.” 

Malgin’s source also claimed that the Achipse Chalet was located not far from the Peskhako residence. It too is described as an official guest house in documents and, like the Peskhako residence, was built by the company Rosinzhiniring. According to Sobesednik, this same company was responsible for building the Igora Ski Resort, which is owned by Svetlana Krivonogikh — mother to Putin’s alleged third daughter Luiza Rosova. 

The construction of the Achipse chalet was financed by its official owner, Gazprom (which is majority state-owned). Sobesednik cites state contracts listing two organizations as responsible for the property’s upkeep. One of them is Gazprom Sotinvest, which sold three hectares of land (7.4 acres) on the outskirts of Moscow to gymnast Alina Kabaeva (Putin’s alleged mistress). The other is Svod International, which manages elite cottages in Krasnaya Polyana, whose tenants include Alina Kabaeva’s mother and the son of Russian National Guard Chief Viktor Zolotov. 

Svod International was founded by the company Vladenie V, which Sobesednik has linked to a mansion near Moscow registered to the “Russian Federation.”

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According to “internal documents,” Sobesednik writes, the Achispe chalet is 3,800 square meters (40,900 square feet) and includes a number of bedrooms and common areas, including a fireplace room. The residence’s “safety regulations” state that the area above it is a no-fly zone for “unmanned aerial vehicles” (drones), unless they have permission from “relevant government agencies.” The documents also state that officers from the Federal Protective Service (Russia’s Secret Service) can access the property freely. 

There’s a designated 2,775-meter (9,100-foot) cable car leading to the Achipse chalet, and the property contains a helipad, a two-story bathhouse, and a 385-square-meter (4,144-square-foot) swimming pool. Despite the fact that the chalet itself only has two above-ground floors, it has six passenger elevators. In addition, the property is protected by a Rohde & Schwarz radar system, which can detect drones, “bugs” (wiretaps), and improvised explosive devices, Sobesednik writes.

The Achipse’s interior decorations include aged-oak flooring inlaid with marble that costs 400,00 rubles per square meter (about $5,400 per 11 square feet). It also houses a grand piano purchased from the German company Blüthner for six million rubles (about $80,900). (The specific model, called the Nicolaus II, was designed for Russian Emperor Nicholas II). Other expensive decorations include a 275,000-ruble ($3,700) candle holder from the French company Christofle, a 140,000-ruble ($1,890) blanket from the Italian company Frette, a 150,000-ruble ($2,020) wine table, 118,000-ruble ($1,590) serving carts, and leather wastebaskets priced at 76,000 rubles ($1,025) each. The chalet also has a collection of handmade copies of medieval tapestries from Italy, gilded vases priced at 187,000 rubles ($2,520) a pop, and glass jugs that cost 168,000 rubles ($2,265) each.

In February 2021, the investigative outlet Proekt wrote that Putin may have more than 20 official and purported residences across Russia. 

We won’t give up Because you’re with us

Summary by Olga Korelina

Translation by Eilish Hart

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