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Russia has spent the past two years trying to force Google to filter its search results. Here's the chronology.

Meduza
On December 11, Russia’s federal media censor <a href="https://meduza.io/en/news/2018/12/11/russia-s-media-regulator-fines-google-half-a-million-rubles-for-ignoring-local-search-engine-censorship-law" target="_blank">fined</a> Google for failing to comply with a law that requires online search engines to purge any hyperlinks to materials that are banned in Russia. Now the American tech giant is supposed to fork over 500,000 rubles ($7,530) — less than the maximum fine of 700,000 rubles (about $10,540). Sources inside Roskomnadzor confirmed to Meduza that Google is the only Internet search engine ever prosecuted for <a href="http://www.consultant.ru/document/cons_doc_LAW_34661/1be89f725498eec6e3ddd58ceb089653adbdae45/" target="_blank">this administrative offense</a>. Russia’s censor is now proposing a second fine, this time at the <a href="https://www.interfax.ru/russia/641922" target="_blank">maximum amount</a>, as well as <a href="https://www.interfax.ru/russia/641915" target="_blank">new legislation</a> that would allow the agency to block search engines that refuse to cooperate with the state authorities.
On December 11, Russia’s federal media censor fined Google for failing to comply with a law that requires online search engines to purge any hyperlinks to materials that are banned in Russia. Now the American tech giant is supposed to fork over 500,000 rubles ($7,530) — less than the maximum fine of 700,000 rubles (about $10,540). Sources inside Roskomnadzor confirmed to Meduza that Google is the only Internet search engine ever prosecuted for this administrative offense. Russia’s censor is now proposing a second fine, this time at the maximum amount, as well as new legislation that would allow the agency to block search engines that refuse to cooperate with the state authorities.

Photo on front page: Sergey Konkov / TASS / Scanpix / LETA